How to Toast in Every Language!

 

The holidays are almost upon us! That special time of year when time spent with the extended family skyrockets from the occasional phone call or birthday card to the complete commandeering of your precious nights and weekends. But we love them nonetheless, and there’s really nothing better than those first few minutes right after the food hits the table at a large family dinner, when you look around and can truly appreciate how lucky you are to be surrounded by those you love. It’s a moment that has been experienced by all people, from all backgrounds, in every culture, all over the world. And it is in this special moment that we toast one another. Though every culture may have a different word for it, in a way, we are all sharing the same moment.

 

  • Albanian: "Gëzuar" (enjoy)
  • Amharic language (Ethiopia): "Le'tenachin!" (To our health)
  • Arabic: "بصحتك" (be ṣaḥtak, for your health)
  • Australian English: Scull (to rapidly finish one's drink[34]); from the Scandinavian "Skål" (bowl)
  • Belarusian: "Будзьма!" (budzma, may we live!)
  • Bosnian: "Nazdravlje" (for health) or "Živjeli" (live!)
  • Bulgarian: "Наздраве" (nazdrave, to health)
  • Catalan: "Xinxin" (onomatopoeic for clinking of glasses)[citation needed] or "Salut" (health)
  • Chinese, Mandarin: "干杯" (gānbēi, lit. "Empty cup", similar to "bottoms up" in English)
  • Czech: "Na zdraví" (to health)
  • Danish: "Skål" (lit. bowl - refers to older drinking vessels)
  • Dutch: "Proost" (from Latin prosit - may it be good (i.e., for you)), or "(op je) gezondheid" ((to your) health); in Belgium: schol (from Scandinavian) or santé (from the French).
  • Estonian: "Terviseks" (for the health)
  • Filipino: "Mabuhay" (to life)
  • Finnish: "Kippis", or "Hölökyn kölökyn" (in Savonian dialects)
  • French: "Tchin Tchin" (onomatopoeic for clinking of glasses)[citation needed] or "Santé" (health) or "cul sec" (lit. "dry bottom", to drink the whole glass in one go)
  • Galician: "Saude" (Good health)
  • Georgian: "Gaumarjos" (victory!)
  • German: "Prost", "Prosit" - from Latin prosit (may it be good (i.e., for you)) or "Zum Wohl" (to health)
  • Greek: "Εις υγείαν" (ees eegiyan), "στην υγειά σου/μας", "γειά" (for health) or "Εβίβα" (eviva, from Italian evviva, "long life!")
  • Hebrew: "L'Chayyim" (to life, traditional Jewish toast)
  • Hungarian: "Egészségünkre" (for our health), more commonly "Egészségedre" (ɛgeːʃːeːgɛdrɛ)(To your health!!)
  • Icelandic: "Skál" (lit. bowl - refers to older drinking vessels)
  • Irish: "Sláinte"
  • Italian: "Cin Cin" (onomatopoeic for clinking of glasses)[citation needed] or "Salute" (health)
  • Japanese: "乾杯" (kanpai, lit. "Dry the glass", similar to "bottoms up" in English)
  • Korean: "건배" (gunbae, lit. "Empty cup", similar to "bottoms up" in English)
  • Latvian: "Priekā" (to joy)
  • Lithuanian: "Į sveikatą" (to health)
  • Macedonian: "На здравје" (na zdravje, to health)
  • Manx Gaelic: "Sláinte" (health) (Irish); slaynt
  • Maori: (NZ) "Mauri ora" (to life)
  • Marathi: "Chang Bhala" (may it be good)
  • Mexican Spanish: "Saludcita" (to health, diminutive)
  • New Hampshire: "Shläng" (Variant of Gaelic Sláinte)
  • Norwegian: "Skål" (lit. bowl - refers to older drinking vessels)
  • Persian: "نوش" (Nūsh, from Middle Persian anosh = "immortality", or Persian verb nushidæn = "to drink")
  • Polish: "Na zdrowie" (to health)
  • Portuguese: "Tim-tim" or "Tchim-Tchim" (onomatopoeic for clinking of glasses)[citation needed] or "Saúde" (health)
  • Romanian: "Noroc" (good luck) or "Sănătate" (health)
  • Russian: "За здоровье" (Za zdorov'ye, for health) or "Ваше здоровье!" (Vashe zdorov'ye, for your health)
  • Scottish Gaelic: "Slàinte mhath" (good health)
  • Serbian: "Nazdravlje" (for health) or "Živeli" (live!)
  • Slovak: "Na zdravie" (to health)
  • Slovene: "Na zdravje" (to health)
  • Spanish/Castilian: "Chin-Chin" (onomatopoeic for clinking of glasses)[citation needed] or "Salud" (health)
  • Swedish: "Skål" (lit. bowl - refers to older drinking vessels[35]); Gutår (good year) - old fashioned, still used in formal settings
  • Swiss German: "Proscht" (as in German "Prost") or as diminutive form "Pröschtli"
  • Thai: "ชัยโย" (chai-yo!, lit. Hurrah!) or "ชนแก้ว" (chon-kaew, lit. Let us toast) or "หมดแก้ว" (mod-kaew, lit. Bottoms up)
  • Turkish: "Şerefe" (to honor)
  • Ukrainian: "Budmo" (let us be!)
  • Vietnamese: "Yô" ((take) in)
  • Welsh: "Iechyd Dda" (Good health)